RSS Feed
» News-Archive

22/Apr/2022
RoHS: Impact study finds positive results, review process has started
The importance of RoHS, the restriction of hazardo
more
06/Jan/2022
“Fire Resistance in Plastics" addresses the need for flame retardants for e-mobility – halogen-free solutions in clear focus
The Fire Resistance in Plastics is one of the most
more
23/Dec/2021
FRPM 2023, European Meeting on Fire Retardant Polymeric Materials, 26.-29.06.2023
  FRPM 21, one of the most important scien
more
15/Dec/2021
New pinfa brochure on innovative fire safety in transportation
Transport vehicles increasingly rely on polymeric
more
07/Oct/2021
“European Meeting on Fire Retardant Polymeric Materials" in Budapest - FRPM21 – real people meeting again live to discuss science
The European Meeting on Fire Retardant Polymeric M
more
17/Aug/2021
Webinar “Resistance to fire, heat and their contaminants” increases awareness for flame retardant solutions for transportation
During this year's webinar by Octima, solution
more

Fire behaviour

How does fire develop?

If you examine the fire progress over time, it can be seen that it often starts out small and slowly but then increases ever more rapidly as more fuel is involved.

How does this look like in a building fire?


An ignition source ignites combustible material, which starts to burn, generating heat, and igniting additional material. The fire propagation is boosted by the increased heat release and temperature of the surroundings. The fire has grown to such an extent that the whole fire load in the room decomposes with the evolution of a flammable gas mixture. The gas ignition causes an extremely high, even explosive, fire spread over the entire room, called "flashover", which leads to the fully developed fire.

The fire now penetrates doors, walls, ceilings and windows and spreads to neighbouring rooms until the whole building is in flames. The room temperature exceed 1,000 °C and the entire fire load in the building burns. The fire has reached its peak and, depending on the fire load, it enters the decreasing phase in which the building is more or less rapidly burnt out.

Flame retardants act in the decisive phase of an initiating fire: they help to prevent ignition or flame propagation and thus flashover.